ARTIST SERIES

Mark Beard, Hercules Mourning the Death of his Cupbearer Hylas
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] Hercules Mourning the Death of his Cupbearer Hylas
Mark Beard, Hyppolite-Alexandre Michallon, The Jungle
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] The Jungle
Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon, Pelican
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] Pelican
Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon, En Route Vers l'Arche
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] En Route Vers l’Arche
Mark Beard, [Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)]  Anglais et ses Trophees
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] Anglais et ses Trophees
Mark Beard, Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon, Le Martyr de St Sebastien
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] Le Martyr de Saint Sébastien
Mark Beard, Hipployte Alexandre Michallon, La Basse-Cour
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] La Basse-Cour
Mark Beard, Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon, Priam Presentant le Corps d'Hecto a sa Famille
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] Priam Présentant le Corps d’Hecto à sa Famille
Mark Beard, Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon, Jeune Homme Attaque Par un Alligator
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] Jeune Homme Attaqué Par un Alligator
Mark Beard, Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon, Le Combat contre les Lapythes
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] Le Combat contre les Lapythes
Mark Beard, Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon, Gorille de la Savane
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] Gorille de la Savane
Mark Beard, Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon, La Mort du Chasseur de Tigre
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] La Mort du Chasseur de Tigre
Mark Beard, Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon, La Chasse aux Cygnes
[Hippolyte-Alexandre Michallon (1849-1930)] La Chasse aux Cygnes

“By his own account, the most ambitious work of Michallon’s career was a thirty-foot canvas depicting Noah’s Ark, which he exhibited in the Salon of 1875, where is when unmentioned by the critics. Preparatory work for this elaborate composition took him frequently to the Jardin des Plantes, where he made painstaking drawings and oil sketches of the animals on view. These studies were enthusiastically remarked upon by visitors to his studio, some of whom counseled him to give up history painting altogether and pursue the less dignified but presumably more lucrative career of animal painter. Following this advice, and profiting from the tremendous vogue in 1880s Europe for all things African, Michallon began painting atmospheric but zoologically correct images of exotic animals in the wild…”

– Wheelock Whitney, September 2004

Work by Mark Beard

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