ARTIST SERIES

low brush on the side of Route 6A, Truro
first snow, Provincetown Harbor from Cook Street Beach, Provincetown
high tide at Herring Cove Beach, Provincetown
sky over Race Point Beach
light on Cape Cod Bay, Provincetown
sand behind Pilgrim Lake, Truro
coral brambles at the base of High Head, Truro
dune (behind Pilgrim Lake), Truro
glare on Pilgrim Lake, Provincetown
brambles at the base of High Head, Truro
tree in Nickerson State Park, Eastham
the Moors, Provincetown
snow on Pilgrim Lake, Provincetown
ice on Duck Creek, Wellfleet
along Nauset Bay, Eastham
the Moors (2), Provincetown
low tide at the Far East End Beach, Provincetown
at the edge of Pilgrim Lake, Truro
trees at Snail Road, Provincetown
snowstorm over Provincetown Harbor (from Cook Street Beach), Provincetown
trees in snowstorm at Snail Road (3), Provincetown
clouds over Herring Cove Beach, Provincetown
sand on snow on sand, Cook Street Beach, Provincetown
dune grass at Snail Road, Provincetown
last snow, Provincetown Harbor from Cook Street Beach, Provincetown
tree at the side of High Head Road, Truro
near the breakwater walking to Herring Cove Beach, Provincetown
after first snow at Herring Cove Beach, Provincetown
shrubbery on the side of Route 6A, Truro
side of barrier dune at Herring Cove Beach, Provincetown
trees at the side of High Head Road, Truro
root at Great Pond, Wellfleet
studio behind the barrier dune at Herring Cove Beach, Provincetown
with Muse at Newcomb Hollow Beach, Wellfleet
dune at Head of the Meadow Beach, Truro
berries on the way to Herring Cove Beach, Provincetown
snowstorm over Provincetown Harbor
sunset at Herring Cove Beach, Provincetown
melting tide in front of Salt Box houses, Provincetown
after snowfall at Head of the Meadow Beach, Truro
sunset on Pilgrim Lake, Provincetown

“Cape Cod is the bared and bended arm of Massachusetts. . .” – – from “Cape Cod: The Shipwreck” (1865) by Henry David Thoreau.

“Bared & Bended” is a series of abstract landscaped chronicling the artist’s first winter in Provincetown, Massachusetts. While Yamrus has frequented Cape Cod for over two decades, it was not until 2003 that he experienced the region’s harsher months. Seeking space from a spiraling personal relationship and solitude for artistic inspiration, Yamrus headed to Provincetown, the place he considers his true home. As part of his daily routine, Yamrus wandered through the frozen landscapes of the Cape. During these walks, he found his psychological space mirrored in the snow, fog, mist, and rain, and with these elements he created the images included in this bosy of work.

Work by Frank Yamrus