ARTIST SERIES

Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1015)
Untitled (Renaissance #1015)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1002)
Untitled (Renaissance #1002)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1001)
Untitled (Renaissance #1001)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1003)
Untitled (Renaissance #1003)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1005)
Untitled (Renaissance #1005)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1014)
Untitled (Renaissance #1014)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1018)
Untitled (Renaissance #1018)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance #1016)
Untitled (Renaissance #1016)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1017)
Untitled (Renaissance #1017)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance #1030)
Untitled (Renaissance #1030)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1009)
Untitled (Renaissance #1009)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1004)
Untitled (Renaissance #1004)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance 1019)
Untitled (Renaissance #1019)
Bill Armstrong, Untitled (Renaissance #1035)
Untitled (Renaissance #1035)

The source materials for the photographs in this series are re-worked master drawings, largely from the Renaissance. The artist’s many layered process of reproduction and blurring, appropriating an image and subjecting it to a series of manipulations (photocopying, cutting, painting, re-photographing) transforms the original images, giving them a new meaning in a new context — a renaissance of the Renaissance, if you will.

The original drawings were attempts to capture the human figure in a specific action, either from Biblical, mythological, or historical scenes, but the rough sketches were removed from the milieu of the larger whole. Armstrong’s process accentuates that extraction, removing them further from their context and adding a new psychology of color to the achromatic drawings.

Work by Bill Armstrong

Press Coverage